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Archive for the ‘Writers’ Workshop’ Category

 

Michael Maren

06/16/2016  by Lindsay Malboeuf  Comment on this Post

“Screenwriting 101”
Open to all, $550
January 16–20, 2017

Workshop Description

Have you ever wanted to write a screenplay but not known where to begin? This workshop starts with the basics: understanding structure, story/plot, and character. Through a series of in-class exercises, you will begin to master the tools of combining these elements into a screenplay. Students may come to class with screenplays they are already working on, an idea they want to turn into a screenplay, or simply a desire to begin writing. Fiction writers looking to gain greater understanding of plot and story structure will also benefit.

Requirements

•    This workshop is open to all levels on a first-come, first-served basis and requires no advance submission. The cost is $550. A deposit of $100 is required to register, with the balance due after 30 days. Enrollment is now open. Scroll to the bottom of this page to make payment.

•    Students should bring a computer with screenwriting software installed.  Final Draft or Screenwriter are recommended but if you’re not able to make that financial commitment there are free applications such as Celtex and Amazon has a free online application as well.

•    Recommended reading:  Screenplay by Syd Field and The Writer’s Journey by Christopher Vogler.

•    Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis until the class is full.

Financial Assistance is available to those who would not otherwise be able to attend—click here for guidelines and application.


About Michael Maren

Michael Maren is a screenwriter and director. He’s written scripts for HBO, Sony Pictures, and many independent producers. His film, A Short History of Decay was described as “beautiful and moving” by New York Magazine. His newest project is an adaptation of the novel Shriver, which he is preparing to direct. He has taught screenwriting at Wesleyan University, The Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center, and the Taos Summer Writers’ Workshop.


Registration

Click here to register online

Dani Shapiro

06/10/2016  by Lindsay Malboeuf  Comment on this Post

From Chaos Into Art: A Workshop in Fiction and Memoir
By application, $550
January 16–20, 2017

Workshop Description

The most helpful writing workshops are ones in which the group acts as a single organism, its sole purpose being to help the piece of work at hand become its best possible self. Memoir, fiction—it’s all storytelling. Whether you’re bringing in pages of a memoir-in-progress or a work of fiction, we approach the page with an eye towards structure, character, voice, place, detail. Find the tenacity and take-no-prisoners courage to do your finest work.  We will spend part of each workshop generating new material based on writing prompts, reading passages from memoirs, stories, and novels that help to illuminate aspects of craft, and reading aloud and discussing excerpts of student manuscripts.

Requirements

This workshop is now full. You can still apply to be considered as an alternate.

Click here to apply via Submittable

•    A short statement describing your current challenges and goals as a writer, as well as your prior experience in workshops.

•    Ten pages of fiction or memoir.

•    The cost of the workshop is $550. If you are accepted, a $100 deposit will be required to hold your place within a week of acceptance, with full payment due by September 30.

•    Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis until the class is full.

Financial Assistance is available to those who would not otherwise be able to attend—click here for guidelines and application.


About Dani Shapiro

Dani Shapiro is the bestselling author of the memoirs Still WritingDevotion,and Slow Motion, and five novels including Black & White and Family History. Her work has appeared in the New Yorker, Granta, Tin House, One Story, Elle, the New York Times Book Review, the op-ed pages of the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, and has been broadcast on This American Life.  Dani was recently Oprah Winfrey’s guest on Super Soul Sunday. She has taught in the writing programs at Columbia, New York University, The New School and Wesleyan University; she is co-founder of the Sirenland Writers Conference in Positano, Italy. A contributing editor at Condé Nast Traveler, Dani lives with her family in Litchfield County, Connecticut. Her next book, Hourglass, will be published by Knopf in the spring of 2017.

Rowan Ricardo Phillips

02/29/2016  by Cara Cannella  Comment on this Post

“Under the Surface: Studying the Music of Your Imagination”
By application, $550
January 16–20, 2017

Workshop Description

In this workshop, we will work to enhance simultaneously your imagination and your use of sound in order to take your poems to their next level. A poem is always about the relationship between its sonic and imaginative parts; this is what convinces the ear that the subject is not only real, but important. We will study techniques used by poets across various eras, as well as workshop your own poems extensively in search of the keenest balance in your work between these three pillars of the art of poetry: sound, subject, and the imagination.

Requirements

Click here to apply via Submittable

•     Admission to this workshop will be based upon an application including a writing sample of three or four poems.

•    Confirmed participants should become familiar with John Hollander’s Rhyme’s Reason in advance of the workshop.

•     The cost of the workshop is $550. If you are accepted, a $100 deposit will be required to hold your place within a week of acceptance, with full payment due within 30 days.

•     Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis beginning March 16 until the class is full.

Financial Assistance is available to those who would not otherwise be able to attend—click here for guidelines and application.


About Rowan Ricardo Phillips

Rowan Ricardo Phillips is the award-winning author of two books of poetry, The Ground and Heaven, both published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux, as well as the acclaimed collection of literary essays When Blackness Rhymes with Blackness and a translation, from the Catalan, of Ariadne in the Grotesque Labyrinth. He has been the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Whiting Writers’ Award, the PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award for Poetry, and the GLCA New Writers Award. He has been a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Poetry and the NAACP Image Award for Poetry, and a long-listed finalist for the PEN Open Book Award and the National Book Award. Published in 2015, Heaven has been named one of the best books or best poetry collections of the year by numerous publications, including the Washington Post and National Public Radio. His poetry has been translated into Catalan, German, Italian, Norwegian, and Spanish.

Also a prodigious sportswriter, Rowan writes a weekly basketball column for the Paris Review. “Just about everything that Rowan Ricardo Phillips has to say about basketball is recommended reading,” hails the Millions. His essays on soccer have been featured in the New Republic, the Paris Review, Howler, and Soccer Gods.

Phillips has taught at Harvard, Columbia, Princeton, and Stony Brook University. He is also a Fellow of the New York Institute for the Humanities at New York University. He lives in New York City and Barcelona.

Kristen-Paige Madonia

02/25/2016  by Cara Cannella  Comment on this Post

“Who, What, When, & Why: An Intro to Young-Adult Lit
Open to all, $550
January 16–20, 2017

Workshop Description

As one of the newest, largest, and most diverse genres in the industry, it is often difficult to define young-adult literature. Through the examination and discussion of Y.A. craft techniques, this class will explore successful tools used to create the unique tone and momentum found in young-adult lit.

This workshop will focus on analysis of the elements of young-adult fiction. Structural elements such as character, plot, point of view, and conflict will be discussed in addition to stylistic elements such as voice, pacing, authenticity, and writing with a sense of urgency. We’ll discuss essays and novel chapters written by published writers, which you will receive ahead of time; however, our primary focus will be the student workshop. By studying the technical elements of storytelling, this course aims to help students become more incisive readers, more effective critics of Y.A. fiction, and more confident creative writers.

Requirements

•     This workshop is open to all levels on a first-come, first-served basis and requires no advance submission. The cost is $550. Minimum deposit of $100 is required to register, with the balance due within 30 days. Enrollment is now open. Scroll to the bottom of this page to make payment. 

•     Each confirmed participant will submit one original piece of young-adult fiction, either a short story or the first chapter of a novel (up to eighteen pages), by December 1. All students are expected to read submissions, along with other works assigned by the instructor, in advance of the workshop.

•     If you have taken Madonia’s introductory workshop before, please note that some class material may be repeated.

Financial Assistance is available to those who would not otherwise be able to attend—click here for guidelines and application.


About Kristen-Paige Madonia

Kristen-Paige Madonia is the author of the young-adult novels Invisible Fault Lines and Fingerprints of You. Hailed by Judy Blume as “a remarkable young novelist,” Madonia was the 2012 D. H. Lawrence Fellow, and her short fiction has appeared in such publications as the Greensboro Review, Five Chapters, New Orleans Review, and American Fiction: Best Previously Unpublished Short Stories by Emerging Writers. She has received awards and fellowships from the Sewanee Writers’ Conference, the Hambidge Center, the Vermont Studio Center, Juniper Summer Writing Institute, Virginia Center for Creative Arts, Hedgebrook Writers’ Retreat, Millay Colony for the Arts, and the Studios of Key West. She was the 2010 recipient of the Tennessee Williams/New Orleans Literary Festival award and was granted the Marianne Russo Fellowship to attend the 2008 Key West Literary Seminar. She holds an MFA from California State University, Long Beach and currently lives in Charlottesville, Virginia, where she teaches creative writing at the University of Virginia and James Madison University. She is also a Faculty Mentor with the University of Nebraska’s low-residency MFA in Writing Program. Visit her at kristenpaigemadonia.com.


Waitlist

Kristen-Paige Madonia’s Workshop is now full. If and when an enrolled participant drops out of the workshop, we will offer the space to members of the waitlist in order of sign-up.

Please use this form to subscribe to the waitlist.

Waiting List for 2017 Kristen-Paige Madonia's Workshop
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Daniel Menaker

02/22/2016  by Cara Cannella  Comment on this Post

“Good Humor: How to Write Funny”
Open to all, $550
January 16–20, 2017

Workshop Description

Each session will consist of three basic segments:

1. Discussion of the comic elements in such classic fiction as Pride and PrejudiceGreat Expectations, and Moby-Dick. (Don’t worry—we’ll be looking at only brief sections of these books.)

2. Reading and discussion of short comic pieces from the New Yorker‘s humor anthology, Fierce Pajamas, and barnesandnoble.com’s humor feature “Grin & Tonic.”

3. Discussion of participants’ writing. During the workshop, each participant in the class must submit a humor piece of 500 to 1,000 words for discussion by the group as a whole. Before our first meeting, I’d like everyone to write a one-page comic description of a dog—any kind of dog. No more than 150 words, please. Make hard copies to pass around.

There will also be brief in-workshop exercises, such as smashing cliches (e.g., “a stitch too late”), timing of jokes, and avoiding formulaic structures. The overall goal of the workshop is to learn some basic techniques of comic writing and to understand that all great writing, except maybe the sermons of Jonathan Edwards and Das Kapital, has comic elements, which tend ultimately to ease the human predicament of existing and not knowing why.

Requirements

•     This workshop is open to all levels on a first-come, first-served basis and requires no advance submission. The cost is $550. Minimum deposit of $100 is required to register, with the balance due by September 30.

•     Participants in the workshop should have available—though they may not all be used—paperback copies of the three novels mentioned above and the New Yorker’s anthology of humor, Fierce Pajamas (also available in paperback).

Financial Assistance is available to those who would not otherwise be able to attend—click here for guidelines and application.


About Daniel Menaker

Daniel Menaker worked for 26 years at the New Yorker, as an editor and writer. He has contributed fiction and humor and essays and journalism to the New Yorker, Harper’s, the Atlantic, the New York Times Magazine, and many other publications and has twice received the O. Henry Award for short fiction. From 1995 through 2007, he was an editor at Random House and was Executive Editor-in-Chief there from 2003 through 2007. He is the author of seven  books, two of them New York Times notable titles. His latest book, The African Svelte: Ingenious Spelling Mistakes That Make Surprising Sense, with illustration by Roz Chast and a foreword by Billy Collins, is forthcoming in fall 2016.


Waitlist

Daniel Menaker’s Workshop is now full. If and when an enrolled participant drops out of the workshop, we will offer the space to members of the waitlist in order of sign-up.

Please use this form to subscribe to the waitlist.

Waiting List for 2017 Daniel Menaker's Workshop
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Kate Moses

02/19/2016  by Cara Cannella  Comment on this Post

“Imagining the Real: Transforming Fact into Fiction”
By application, $550
January 16–20, 2017

Workshop Description

How many of our most compelling works of fiction have been inspired by real people, real events, real objects in the real world? A shorter list might be those that aren’t. James Salter once said that “most great novels and stories come not from things that are entirely invented, but from perfect knowledge and close observation.” In this workshop we will focus the magnifying lens of attentiveness on the real-world raw material that life and history have entrusted to us—whether that means an iconic family heirloom, a societal watershed, a life glimpsed through the amber of time, or an unforgettable work of art. We will discuss examples of fictions with factual underpinnings and use daily exercises to fan the flames of story, subtext, and metaphor from the kindling fires of our potent subjects.

This workshop is designed to be more generative and/or process-deepening in scope than revisionist, though writers with fact-based fictional works in progress are welcome.

Requirements

This workshop is now full. You can still apply to be considered as an alternate.

Click here to apply via Submittable

•     Admission to this workshop will be based upon an application including a writing sample of two to eight pages of fiction, along with a brief letter outlining your desire to take the workshop. In the letter, please include a description of the factual material, including photos or other documentation (if available), that you wish to explore and share in class.

•     The cost of the workshop is $550. If you are accepted, a $100 deposit will be required to hold your place within a week of acceptance, with full payment due by September 30.

•     Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis beginning March 16 until the class is full.

•     All confirmed participants will be expected to read works for discussion assigned by the instructor in advance of the workshop.

Financial Assistance is available to those who would not otherwise be able to attend—click here for guidelines and application.


About Kate Moses

Kate Moses is the author of the internationally acclaimed Wintering: A Novel of Sylvia Plath, published in fifteen languages and recipient of the Janet Heidinger Kafka Prize and a Prix des Lectrices de Elle, and Cakewalk: A Memoir, chosen by National Public Radio as one of their favorite memoirs of 2010. Moses is also co-editor of two bestselling, award-winning anthologies of essays on motherhood, Mothers Who Think: Tales of Real-Life Parenthood and Because I Said So: 33 Mothers Write About Children, Sex, Men, Aging, Faith, Race & Themselves. Both anthologies were the offspring of Salon’s popular, pioneering daily feature Mothers Who Think, of which she was a founding editor during the internet’s infancy.

The Fayum Portraits, a novel inspired by a 2,000-year-old Egyptian memorial painting, is in progress. She has received a Lannan Literary Fellowship, an American Book Award, a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection, fellowship residencies from the Djerassi Foundation and the MacDowell Colony, and has been a guest writer at numerous conferences and universities. A native San Franciscan, she now lives in Essex, New York.

Jennine Capó Crucet

02/19/2016  by Cara Cannella  Comment on this Post

“No Word Out of Place: Revision from the Ground Up”
By application, $550
January 16–20, 2017

Workshop Description

Acclaimed novelist and short story writer Charles Baxter once said in an interview, “Sometimes a story will stand or fall on a simple word choice or on one sentence in the middle of a paragraph that either says too much or doesn’t say enough … I am amazed by the way that a story can fail by having a few words out of place.”

In this workshop, we’re going to hunt down those words and tackle revision on the sentence level—all the while seeing how these choices change the story as a whole. We’ll start by examining paragraphs and sentences in published short stories, digging deeply into them on the word- and sentence-level to see what makes them tick. We’ll talk about how revising the seemingly small things—sentence structure, word choice, punctuation—leads to important shifts in the big things like point of view, characterization, theme, and plot. We’ll figure out how the building blocks of stories—the words themselves—impact the overall picture, and then we’ll apply what we discover to our own work, transforming the sentences of our stories, paragraph by paragraph, to reveal the story’s full potential. We’ll also do short exercises both in and out of class based on the stories you submit, and these will showcase additional craft elements that will feed into our discussion of our own work.

This workshop is intended for advanced fiction writers looking to interrogate and thus hone their prose style. Previous workshop experience is highly recommended.

Requirements

This workshop is now full. You can still apply to be considered as an alternate.

Click here to apply via Submittable

•    Admission to this workshop will be based upon an application including a writing sample of twenty pages (twelve-point font, double-spaced) or fewer. Please submit a story or novel chapter that you feel represents your clearest voice on the page. This manuscript can serve as your piece for revision / examination during the workshop, or you may submit another manuscript as the workshop approaches.

•     The cost of this workshop is $550. If you are accepted, a $100 deposit will be required to hold your place within a week of acceptance, with full payment due by September 30.

• Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis beginning March 16 until the class is full.

•    Confirmed participants are expected to read the manuscripts of fellow writers in advance of the workshop. These will be emailed prior to the start of the conference.

Financial Assistance is available to those who would not otherwise be able to attend—click here for guidelines and application.


About Jennine Capó Crucet

Jennine Capó Crucet is the author of the novel Make Your Home Among Strangers and the story collection How to Leave Hialeah. The recipient of the Iowa Short Fiction Prize, the John Gardner Book Award, and the Devil’s Kitchen Reading Award, her writing has appeared in the New York Times, the Los Angeles Review, Epoch, Prairie Schooner, Ploughshares, and elsewhere. A winner of an O. Henry Prize and the Picador Fellowship, she was raised in Miami and is currently on the faculty of the University of Nebraska’s Creative Writing Program.

Marie Myung-Ok Lee

02/05/2016  by Cara Cannella  Comment on this Post

“Writing Irresistible Fiction and Creative Nonfiction”
By application, $550
January 16–20, 2017

Workshop Description

Humans are storytelling animals. But what is it about a narrative—short story, novel, essay, memoir?—that makes it, well, irresistible to read? In this workshop we will examine different elements—narrative, plot, action, dialogue—as applicable to each form, to help us utilize these techniques to their fullest effect. This advanced workshop will include deep reading and writing exercises and is geared toward people who will bring work to share and be critiqued. The critiquing techniques you learn will also be helpful for soliciting feedback or starting your own critique group back home.

Requirements

This workshop is now full. You can still apply to be considered as an alternate.

Click here to apply via Submittable

•     Admission to this workshop will be based upon an application including the following required materials:

1. Short statement describing the project you will bring to the workshop if accepted.

2. Short statement indicating whether you have had previous experience (not required but helpful) in writers’ workshops in the past, including at KWLS.

3. Writing sample of twelve pages or fewer. Please note whether it is complete, an excerpt, a story, or part of a longer work. Send your best work.

•     The cost of the workshop is $550. If you are accepted, a $100 deposit will be required to hold your place within a week of acceptance, with full payment due by September 30.

Financial Assistance is available to those who would not otherwise be able to attend—click here for guidelines and application.


About Marie Myung-Ok Lee

Marie Myung-Ok Lee’s next novel is forthcoming with Simon & Schuster in 2017. She is a staff writer for the Millions and her work has appeared in the New York Times, Slate, the Guardian, the Nation, the Atlantic, Five Chapters, and Salon. She was the first recipient of a creative writing Fulbright Fellowship to South Korea and has won the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts fiction fellowship, the Richard Margolis award for social justice reporting, and was a finalist for the United States Artists Fellowship, which honors “innovative, accomplished artists at all stages of their careers.” She was the recipient of a MacColl Johnson artist fellowship, which is one of the largest no-strings-attached fellowships of its kind and was a judge for the National Book Award. She teaches at Columbia University, where she was the Our Word Writer in Residence, and has taught at Brown and Yale Universities. In 2015, she finished her novel as a KWLS writer-in-residence.

Billy Collins

02/05/2016  by Lindsay Malboeuf  Comment on this Post

“Poetry: Pursuing the Love of Strangers”
By application, $550
January 16–20, 2017

Workshop Description

Using the indifference of the reader as a starting point, we will explore techniques that will capture and maintain the interest of this sometimes mythical creature. We will aim to write poems that do not offer the reader the opportunity to stop reading.  Easier said than done, I know—but there are ways.

Requirements

This workshop is now full. You can still apply to be considered as an alternate.

Click here to apply via Submittable

•    Admission to this workshop will be based upon an application including a writing sample of three or four poems. Those who have taken a workshop with Collins before, here or elsewhere, are not eligible to apply.

•    The cost of the workshop is $550. If you are accepted, a $100 deposit will be required to hold your place within a week of acceptance, with full payment due by September 30.

Financial Assistance is available to those who would not otherwise be able to attend—click here for guidelines and application.


About Billy Collins

Billy Collins is a two-term United States Poet Laureate, New York State Poet, and the author of ten collections of poetry, including his latest, Aimless Love: New and Selected Poems.

Called “the most popular poet in America” by the New York Times, Collins has led an unflagging career as a poet and public figure, and has introduced countless readers around the world to new poets and poetry. With the Library of Congress, he established Poetry 180, a teaching aid for high school students founded on the belief that “high school is often the place where poetry goes to die.”

Collins has received fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts, The National Endowment for the Arts, and the Guggenheim Foundation, and has won the Mark Twain Prize, the Bess Hokin Prize, the Frederick Bock Prize, the Oscar Blumenthal Prize, and the Levinson Prize—all awarded by Poetry magazine. In 1992 he was chosen by the New York Public Library to serve as a “Literary Lion.” His poems appear regularly in The Best American Poetry series, and he edited Bright Wings: An Anthology of Poems about Birds.

Collins is a Distinguished Fellow of the Winter Park Institute at Rollins College.

Kevin Young

06/16/2015  by Kali Fajardo-Anstine  Comment on this Post

“Poems of Praise: Everyday Addresses, from Odes to Elegies”
Intermediate, $550.00
January 11–15, 2016

Workshop Description

In this intensive course, we will invigorate our poems and our writing lives with a focus on the everyday and the extraordinary, from food to loss. Students will write toward odes to everyday things in the spirit of Neruda and Lucille Clifton; we will also address poems to lost places and people, as a way of finding voices and tones that are our own. The result is less a poetry workshop than a lab for living.

Requirements

•     There is no fee to apply; if you are accepted into the workshop, a $100 deposit will be required to hold your place, with full payment due by September 30. Financial assistance is available to those who would not otherwise be able to attend.

•     Admission to the workshop will be based on a writing sample of two poems, along with a brief cover letter.

•     To Apply, please prepare your submission as a single file (.pdf or .doc format preferred). Include your name and email address at the top right-hand corner of each page. File names should adhere to the format: “Lastname_Firstname.pdf.” Once your submission is ready, fill out our application below and attach your poems using our file uploader.

UPDATE: This workshop is now full. Submit an application below to be considered as an alternate.


About Kevin Young

Kevin Young is the author of ten books of poetry and prose, most recently Book of Hours, a finalist for the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award. Young’s The Grey Album: On the Blackness of Blackness, won the Graywolf Nonfiction Prize, was a New York Times Notable Book for 2012, a finalist for the 2013 National Book Critics Circle Award for criticism, and won the PEN Open Award. He is Charles Howard Candler Professor of Creative Writing & English and curator of Literary Collections & the Raymond Danowski Poetry Library at Emory University, and served as the Holmes Visiting Poet at Princeton University for spring 2015.​


—Workshop Application—

Susan Shreve

06/03/2015  by Kali Fajardo-Anstine  Comment on this Post

“Something Happened: Building from Scene to Short”
Intermediate, $550.00
January 11–15, 2016

Workshop Description

Short stories and novels alike are usually a compiling of individual dramatic scenes. Understanding how these very short stories are constructed is crucial to writing and reading fiction. This workshop will consider the single scene as a small story, which might be part of a novel or short story but is sufficient unto itself as well.

Each participant will bring a scene to class and these pieces will comprise the essential part of our discussions. We will also be looking at stories by Anton Chekhov, Alice Munro, Katherine Mansfield, and others, concentrating on one or two scenes in each of the stories to understand how the writer has built a story from scene to scene.

Requirements

•   The full cost of this four-day workshop is $550.00. There is no fee to apply; if you are accepted into the workshop, a $100 deposit will be required to hold your place, with full payment due by September 30. Financial assistance is available to those who would not otherwise be able to attend—guidelines and application details are available here.
•     All students are expected to read works assigned by the instructor, and the submissions of fellow students, in advance of the workshop. These will be emailed in advance of the workshop.
•    To Apply, please submit a very short story or a scene from a longer story or novel (ten pages or less),  along with a brief cover letter addressing your desire to take the workshop. Include your name and email address at the top right-hand corner of each page. File names should adhere to the format: “Lastname_Firstname.pdf.” Once you are ready, please fill out our application below and attach your submission using our file uploader.


About Susan Shreve

Susan Shreve is the author of fourteen novels, most recently You Are the Love of My Life (2012), and A Student of Living Things (2006). A memoir, Warm Springs: Traces of a Childhood was published in 2007. More News Tomorrow, a novel, is forthcoming from W.W. Norton. Shreve has written thirty books for children, her latest, The Lovely Shoes, was published in June 2011 and The Search for Baby Ruby from Arthur A Levine/Scholastic will be published in June 2015. What Are You Going to Do With a Boy Like Me is in progress. She has received a Guggenheim Award for Fiction, a National Endowment grant for Fiction, the Jenny Moore Chair in Creative Writing at George Washington University and has won both the Grub Street Prize for non-fiction and the Service award from Poets and Writers. She has taught in the MFA at Columbia School of the Arts and for three years at Princeton University. She founded the MFA at George Mason University, where she remains as a Professor and is chairman of the PEN/Faulkner Foundation, a position she shared with the late and beloved Robert Stone.


—Workshop Application—

Campbell McGrath

05/21/2015  by Kali Fajardo-Anstine  Comment on this Post

“Hearing Voices: Crafting the Poetic Voice”
Intermediate level, $550.00
January 11–15, 2016

Workshop Description

“Find your voice,” the poet is told, as if it might be hiding under the bed, or on sale somewhere at the mall. But writer’s voices are not found—they are developed, constructed, shaped, refined. And who says you only get one? Why not develop a range of voices to address different moods, manners and materials? Crafting the poetic voice is the focus of this workshop, which will examine models ranging from Walt Whitman to Elizabeth Bishop to the haiku master Shiki, while retaining its primary focus on participants’ own creative work.

Requirements

•     The full cost of this four-day workshop is $550.00. There is no fee to apply; if you are accepted into the workshop, a $100 deposit will be required to hold your place, with full payment due by September 30. Financial assistance is available to those who would not otherwise be able to attend.

•     Admission to the workshop will be based on a writing sample of three to five poems.

•     This workshop is now full. To Apply, please prepare your submission of three to five poems as a single file (.pdf or .doc format preferred). Include your name and e-mail address at the top right-hand corner of each page. File names should adhere to the format: “Lastname_Firstname.pdf.” Once your submission is ready, fill out our application below and attach your poems using our file uploader.


About Campbell McGrath

Campbell McGrath is the author of nine books of poetry, including Spring Comes to Chicago, Florida Poems, Seven Notebooks, and most recently In the Kingdom of the Sea Monkeys (Ecco Press, 2012). He has received many of America’s major literary prizes for his work, including the Kingsley Tufts Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, a MacArthur Fellowship, a USA Knight Fellowship, and a Witter-Bynner Fellowship from the Library of Congress. His poetry has appeared in the New Yorker, Harper’s, the Atlantic and on the op-ed page of the New York Times, as well as in scores of literary reviews and quarterlies. Born in Chicago, he lives with his family in Miami Beach and teaches at Florida International University, where he is the Philip and Patricia Frost Professor of Creative Writing.

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