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Kaufelt-SQ

David A. Kaufelt

“I have a theory why we all live here—it’s called the Peter Pan theory. Freud said we’re at our most creative before we’re five years old. That’s where we are here. We wear shorts, we ride bicycles, we have the water, a great symbol of the unconscious, and we’re free to be children here and let our spirits go.”

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Kaufelt-SQ

David A. Kaufelt

“I have a theory why we all live here—it’s called the Peter Pan theory. Freud said we're at our most creative before we’re five years old. That’s where we are here. We wear shorts, we ride bicycles, we have the water, a great symbol of the unconscious, and we’re free to be children h...

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John Banville & Benjamin Black

“We have this illusion that we are unitary beings. We have the notion that there is a pilot light inside us that is one's self. I don't believe this is the case. We're a collection of poses, of attitudes, of versions of ourselves. We make ourselves up as we go along. This is what makes life in...

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Carl Hiaasen

In Florida, news tends toward the outlandish, Carl Hiaasen explains, and it’s difficult to write stories that don’t eventually come true. On this hilarious recording, Hiaasen recounts his favorite Florida news items, including the disappearance of legendary Key West Fire Chief Joseph “Bum” F...

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Megan Abbott, Gillian Flynn, Laura Lippman

Laura Lippman, Megan Abbott, and Gillian Flynn discuss how novels and films featuring women protagonists are presented in popular culture and perceived by audiences. “Things that make men cry are considered profound,” remarks Lippman. “Things that make women cry are considered sentimental.”

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Sara Paretsky

Sara Paretsky weaves together contemporary social and political issues as they relate to mystery and crime fiction. She asks “What is the role of the writer?” while warning of the dangers of self-censorship and government surveillance; and she reminds us that fiction reveals essential truths abo...

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Harvey Shapiro

The late Harvey Shapiro reads a selection of his poems as well as work by Richard Wilbur and Yiddish writer Joseph Rolnik. Shapiro discusses the impact of World War II on the ‘class of 1924’ and talks about his mentors Charles Reznikoff, Louis Zukofsky, and George Oppen.

Tennessee Williams

Tennessee Williams

The great playwright Tennessee Williams produced this recording for the Key West Library in 1971. The fifteen-poem selection includes the never-published ‘The wayward flesh has made me wise…’ and provides a rare opportunity to hear the voice of an American master.

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Geoff Dyer

In an interview with Christopher Lydon, Geoff Dyer argues that literary greatness should not be measured by the novel, but by marginal genres like essays, letters, and travel writing. The pursuit of truth in literature will succeed only when you ‘remain absolutely faithful to the vagaries of your ...

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Colm Tóibín

Irish novelist Colm Tóibín discusses Elizabeth Bishop and Thom Gunn. It is part of their achievement as poets, he argues, that 'Bishop and Gunn, in a confessional age, masked their grief with reason.' Includes close readings of Bishop's 'One Art,' 'Poem,' and 'North Haven' and Gunn's 'In Santa Mar...

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Phyllis Rose

Phyllis Rose explores our fascination with writers' lives, while uncovering the dueling impulses of biography and critical theory. 'Writing is done in private and involves a descent into the self,' she says. 'This struggle for truth and precision is so specialized, so private, so word-dependent, tha...

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George Saunders

George Saunders is a fiction writer and essayist noted for his acute sense of satire, outrageous humor, and keenly perceptive observations on contemporary life. In this talk, he recounts his coming of age as a writer and explains how he learned to stop aping his literary idols and begin making use o...

James Merrill

James Merrill

This 1993 reading in tribute to Elizabeth Bishop reveals James Merrill’s significant gifts as a reader and interpreter of Bishop’s work, and suggests the depths of the influence he felt from the poet who “set standards for me as no other contemporary did.”

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