Feeding the Muse: Elizabeth Bishop

362

“May the Future’s Happy Hours Bring you Beans & Rice & Flowers.” 1955 watercolor by Elizabeth Bishop. Excitement is building in Key West for THE HUNGRY MUSE, our 29th annual Seminar, coming up January 6 – 16, 2011. As we wait for today’s top food writers to arrive, we’ve been …Read More


Feeding the Muse: Wallace Stevens

362

At home in Hartford, Wallace Stevens was a strict New England businessman, ungiven to personal excess or displays of passion. In Key West, on the other hand, Stevens permitted himself the eccentricities he normally relegated to the page. He mailed unusual tropical fruits home to his wife, Elsie, and wrote of drinking Scotch in his pajamas in the moonlight beneath the palm trees. He was fond of green coconut ice cream, mangoes, and cocktails.


Feeding the Muse: Ernest Hemingway

362

Like Hemingway’s prose style, his diet in Key West was composed of basic elements and depended upon an active sporting life. He spent weeks fishing and hunting shorebirds in the Marquesas and Tortugas, clusters of islands 30-60 miles west of Key West, and the quarry from these trips seems to have been his culinary staple.


JAMES LEO HERLIHY
The Midnight Cowboy in Key West

362

James Leo Herlihy was born in Detroit in 1927 and raised there and in Chillicothe, Ohio. He lived in New York City, Los Angeles, and, off and on from 1957 to 1973, in Key West, where he became “captivated,” finding it “a wonderful place to work and write.”


From the Archives

362

John Malcolm Brinnin helped establish New York City’s 92nd St. Y as a national focal point for poetry in the 1950s and was a crucial influence on the Key West Literary Seminar in our early years. The author of Grand Luxe: The Transatlantic Style, he was also a great fan of travel aboard luxury ocean liners, the now-extinct class of which the QE2 was the highest iteration. Rita Dove, at the time, was the nation’s poet laureate.


KWLS Founder David A. Kaufelt turns 70

362

David A. Kaufelt, who capitalized on a successful career in New York as a novelist and executive to found the Key West Literary Seminar nearly 30 years ago, celebrates his 70th birthday today. His books include Six Months with an Older Woman (1973), later adapted for a made-for-tv movie starring John Ritter, American Tropic (1986), a historical-fiction account of the development of Florida, and the series of murder mysteries featuring lawyer-cum-detective Wyn Lewis, among them The Fat Boy Murders (1993).


Lawson Corbett Little shot Key West

362

Lawson Corbett Little was born in Chicago in 1945 and studied photography at the Rhode Island School of Design and the California Institute of the Arts. For much of the past 20 years, he has lived in Nashville, photographing luminaries of the country music scene including Dwight Yoakam and Hank Williams III. In the 1970s and 1980s Little lived in Key West, where he helped establish the photography program at Florida Keys Community College and photographed notable authors and musicians including James Merrrill, Thomas McGuane, Jimmy Buffett, Philip Caputo, and David Allan Coe. The images above are among hundreds Little produced of Shel Silverstein, the inestimably talented writer, artist, and musician.